Abortion worker comments on “loss of control” with pain relief

An abortion clinic worker named Carole said:

“People have pain when they don’t have drugs, but I don’t know that pain is always a bad thing. Valium is like drinking in that it numbs you. For women with issues about control or sexual abuse, that loss of control can do more harm than good.”

Anna Runkle In Good Conscience: A Practical, Emotional, and Spiritual Guide to Deciding Whether to Have an Abortion (San Francisco: Jossey–Bass Publishers, 1998)

This abortion worker says that women who have suffered sexual abuse might be reminded of their trauma when “losing control” under anesthesia during an abortion procedure. They may be reminded of their helplessness, while in a drugged state during an invasion of their bodies. Abortion can be harmful for these women.

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Study by Anne Speckhard on emotional trauma

Researcher Anne Speckhard conducted a study that showed how abortion causes emotional trauma in women.

She interviewed women who regretted their abortions and found that they experienced the following:

• grief reactions (100 percent)

• feelings of depression (92 percent)

• feelings of anger (92 percent)

• feelings of guilt (92 percent)

• fear that others would learn of the pregnancy and abortion (89 percent)

• surprise at the intensity of the emotional reaction to the abortion (85 percent)

• feelings of lowered self worth (81 percent)

• feelings of victimization (81 percent)

• decreased effectiveness, or suppressed ability to experience pain (73 percent)

• feelings of discomfort around infants and small children (73 percent).

Anne Speckhard The Psycho-Social Aspects of Stress Following Abortion (Sheed and Ward, Kansas City, 1987)

Quoted in:  “ABORTION A Briefing Book For Canadian Legislators” Campaign Life Coalition NATIONAL PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE July 2002

These women were a selected sample of those who regretted their abortions, so this may not be representative of ALL women who have abortions. But the study shows that some women have  emotional trauma due to abortion.

Read more about abortion’s psychological impact and the emotional trauma it causes.

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Study shows abortion doesn’t improve mental illness

Before abortion was legalized in the United States, women could get permission for an abortion by going to a psychiatrist and proving they were mentally ill and would be a adversely affected by the pregnancy. A study done soon after abortion’s legalization however, shows:

“…it would appear that the more serious the psychiatric diagnosis: the less beneficial was the abortion…As might be expected chronic characterological neurotic or psychotic conditions are not solved by abortion, which is in essence a form of environmental manipulation.”

Ford et al., “Abortion: Is it a Therapeutic Procedure in Psychiatry?” Journal of the American Medical Association in November, 1978

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After abortion, women are 85% more likely to have miscarriage

A study found women who had abortions had a higher rate of miscarriage, labor complications, and premature birth:

“Those who had one or more abortions were 85 percent more likely to have a miscarriage in a future pregnancy; were 32 percent more likely to give birth to an infant with low birthweight; were 67 percent more likely to have a premature birth; were 47 percent more likely to have labor complications; and were 83 percent more likely to experience complications in delivery.”

“A Prospective Study of the Effects of Induced Abortion on Subsequent Reproductive Function,” research contract No. N01-HD-6-2802, sponsored by the National Child Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

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David Ferguson does 25 Year Study

Pro-life doctor Marissa Ogle, M.D wrote about an abortion study that pro-abortion people tried to repress,by Dr. David Ferguson:

“A reputable research scientist attempted to publish results of a well-designed study that concluded, to his surprise, that abortion has a negative impact on the psychological well-being of women. This study by Dr. David Ferguson, a New Zealand pro-choice researcher who was attempting to disprove abortion’s psychological effect on women, found that 42% of women who have had abortions had experienced major depression within the prior 4 years – almost double the rate of women who never became pregnant. The study also indicates that women who have had abortions are twice as likely to drink alcohol at dangerous levels and 3 times as likely to be addicted to illegal substances. The study also found that the risk of anxiety disorders was doubled.

Dr. Ferguson’s study was well-designed, spanning the course of 25 years… The study was undertaken with the position of validating the viewpoint that abortion did not increase mental health problems, but to confirm that these problems were preexisting. Much to the surprise of the researching team, the exact opposite was true. When Dr. Ferguson’s results were presented to New Zealand’s abortion supervisory committee, which ensures that abortions in the country are conducted in accordance with legal requirements, Dr. Ferguson was discouraged from publishing the results. Fortunately, despite his political beliefs, Dr. Ferguson felt that this would be “scientific irresponsibility.” Ferguson himself stated that he remains pro-choice and is not a religious person. The findings were surprising to him, however in his opinions were very robust. He went on to say that abortion is a traumatic event, involving loss and grief that may, in fact, predispose women to mental illness.

The doctor found:

“The fact is that abortions are the most common medical procedure that young women face – by the age of 25, one in 7 have had an abortion – and the research into the costs and benefits have been very weak. This is because the debate between the pro-life and the pro-choice has, in a sense, driven the science out. It verges on scandalous that a surgical procedure that is performed on over one in 10 women has been so poorly researched and evaluated, given the debates about the psychological consequences of abortion.”

Quote is from Ruth Hill “Abortion researcher confounded by study” The New Zealand Herald January 5, 2006

The pro-life author says:

Ferguson then went on to experience a great challenge in finding a journal that would publish the study, very unusual for a research team who typically has research published with the first attempt. A subsequent study by Ferguson reiterated his findings.”

Marissa Ogle, M.D. Still Healing:(2016)  13 – 14

The studies are:

David Ferguson, M., L. John Horwood, Elizabeth M Ritter “Abortion in young women and subsequent mental health” Journal of Psychology and Psychiatry 47.9 (2013): 819 – 27

David Ferguson, LJ Horwood, JM Bowden “Does abortion reduce the mental health risks of unintended pregnancy? A reappraisal of the evidence” Aust N Z Journal of Psychiatry 47.1 (2006): 16 – 24

Read more about abortion’s mental health risks

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Risks after abortion: depression +37%, alcohol use/abuse +110%,

A pro-life doctor writes about psychological health risks of abortion:

“In an article written by Dr. Priscilla Coleman, a professor of Human Development and Family Studies at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, she offers the most comprehensive assessment of mental health risks associated with an abortion that can be found anywhere in published medical literature. In brief summary, the increase in risk for anxiety disorders was 34%, depression 37%, alcohol use/abuse 110%, marijuana use/abuse 220% and suicide 155%.”

Marissa Ogle, M.D. Still Healing (2016) 14-15

She is citing:

Priscilla K Coleman “Abortion and mental health: quantitative synthesis and analysis of research published 1995 – 2009) The British Journal of Psychiatry 47.9 (2013)

Learn about more studies on abortion’s emotional and psychological effects

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Study: Abortion causes “overwhelming guilt”

One study on the mental health aspects of abortion found the following:

“[N]o amount of rationalization, intellectualization or humanistic considerations can relieve the overwhelming guilt which is present at the unconscious level as a result of an abortion. Furthermore, much of what we encounter at the conscious level regarding the feelings which patients report about abortion represents denial, displacement or rationalization, and we find it rather strange that so many professionals are misled by these commonly employed defensive procedures.”

Maddox and Sexton, “The Rising Cost of Abortion,” Medical Hypoanalysis,Spring, 1980, page 67

Quoted in:  “ABORTION A Briefing Book For Canadian Legislators” Campaign Life Coalition NATIONAL PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE July 2002

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Studies that link abortion to breast cancer

Here are a list of studies that show that abortion increases the risk of breast cancer. They are in chronological order:

Segi M, et al. An epidemiological study on cancer in Japan. GANN. 48 1957;1–63.

Watanabe H, et al. Epidemiology and clinical aspects of breast cancer. [in Japanese], Nippon Rinsho 26, no. 8. 1968;1843–1849.

Dvoyrin VV, et al. Role of women’s reproductive status in the development of breast cancer. Methods and Progress in Breast cancer Epidemiology Research Tallin 1978;53-63.

Pike MC, et al. Oral contraceptive use and early abortion as risk factors for breast cancer in young women. Br J Cancer 43, no. 1. 1981;72-6.

Nishhiyama, F. The epidemiology of breast cancer in Tokushima prefecture. Shikoku Ichi 1982; 38:333-43 (in Japanese).

Brinton LA, et al. Reproductive factors in the etiology of breast cancer. Br J Cancer 47, no. 6. 1983:757-762.

Le M-G, Bachelot A, et al. Oral contraceptive use and breast or cervical cancer: Preliminary results of a case-control study In: Wolff J-P, Scott JS, eds. Hormones and sexual factors in human cancer aetiology. Amsterdam: Elsevier 1984:139-47.

Hirohata T, et al. Occurrence of breast cancer in relation to diet and reproductive history: a case-control study in Fukuoka, Japan. Natl Cancer Inst Monographs 69 1985:187-90.

LaVecchia C, et al. General epidemiology of breast cancer in northern Italy. Intl J of Epidemiol. 1987;16 3:347-355.

Ewertz M, et al. Risk of breast cancer in relation to reproductive factors in Denmark. Br J Cancer 58, no. 1 1988:99-104.

Luporsi E. (1988), in Andrieu N, Duffy SW, Rohan TE, Le MG, Luporsi E, Gerber M, Renaud R, Zaridze DG, Lifanova Y, Day NE. Familial risk, abortion and their interactive effect on the risk of breast cancer—a combined analysis of six case-control studies. Br J Cancer 1995;72:744-751.

Zaridze DG. (1988) in Andrieu N, Duffy SW, Rohan TE, Le MG, Luporsi E, Gerber M, Renaud R, Zaridze DG, Lifanova Y, Day NE. Familial risk, abortion and their interactive effect on the risk of breast cancer—a combined analysis of six case-control studies. Br J Cancer 1995;72:744-751.

Rosenberg L, et al. Breast cancer in relation to the occurrence and the time of the induced and spontaneous abortion. Amer J Epidemiol 127, no. 5 1988:981-989.

Howe HL, et al. Early abortion and breast cancer risk among women under age 40. Intl J Epidemiol 18, no 2 1989:300-4.

Remennick L. Reproductive patterns in cancer incidence in women: A population based correlation study in the USSR. Intl J Epidemiol 1989 (18) 3:498-510.

Adami HO, et al. Absence of association between reproductive variables and the risk of breast cancer in young women in Sweden and Norway. Br J Cancer 62, no 1 1990:122–6.

Laing AE, et al. Breast cancer risk factors in African-American women: The Howard University tumor registry experience. J Natl Med Assoc 85 1993:931-939.

Andrieu N, Clavel F, Gairard B, Piana L, Bremond A, Lansac J, Flamant R, Renaud R. Familial risk of breast cancer and abortion. Cancer Detect Prevent 1994;18(1):51-55.

Daling JR, et al. Risk of breast cancer among young women: relationship to induced abortion. J Natl Cancer Inst 86, no. 21 1994;1584-92.

Laing AE, et al. Reproductive and lifestyle factors for breast cancer in African-American women. Gent Epidemiol 1994;11:A300.

White E, et al. Breast cancer among young US women in relation to oral contraceptive use. J Natl Cancer Inst 1994;86:505-14.

Andrieu N, Duffy SW, Rohan TE, Le MG, Luporsi E, Gerber M, Renaud R, Zaridze DG, Lifanova Y, Day NE. Familial risk, abortion and their interactive effect on the risk of breast cancer—a combined analysis of six case-control studies. Br J Cancer 1995;72:744-751.

Bu L, et al. Risk of breast cancer associated with induced abortion in a population at low risk of breast cancer. Amer J Epidemiol 141 1995;S85.

Lipworth L, et al. Abortion and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Greece. Intl J Cancer 61, no. 2 1995;181-4.

Rookus MA, et al. Breast Cancer risk after an induced abortion, a Dutch case-control study. Amer J Epidemiol 1995;141:S54 (abstract 214).

Daling JR, Brinton LA, Voigt LF, et al. Risk of breast cancer among white women following induced abortion. Amer J Epidemiol 1996;144:373-380.

Newcomb PA, et al. Pregnancy termination in relation to risk of breast cancer. J Amer Med Assoc 275, no. 4 1996:283-287.

Rookus MA, van Leeuwan FE. Induced abortion and risk for breast cancer: reporting (recall) bias in a Dutch case-control study. J Natl Cancer Inst 1996;88:1759-1764.

Talamini, R, et al. The role of reproductive and menstrual factors in cancer of the breast before and after menopause. European J Cancer 32, no. 2 1996:303-310.

Tavani A, La Vecchia C, Franceschi S, Negri E, D’avanao B, Decarli A. Abortion and breast cancer risk. Intl J Cancer 1996;65:401-05.

Wu AH, et al. Menstrual and reproductive factors and risk of breast cancer in Asian-Americans. Br J Cancer 73, no. 5 1996:680-6.

Melbye M, et al. Induced abortion and the risk of breast cancer. N Engl J Med 336, no. 2. 1997:81-85.

Palmer J. Induced and spontaneous abortion in relation to risk of breast cancer. Cancer Causes and Control 8, no. 6 1997:841-849.

Fioretti F. Risk factors for breast cancer in nulliparous women. Br J Cancer 1999 78 (11/12) 1923-1928.

Marcus, PM, et al. Adolescent reproductive events and subsequent breast cancer risk. Amer J Public Health 89, no. 8 1999:1244-1247.

Lazovich D, et al. Induced abortion and breast cancer risk.Epidemiol 11, no. 1 2000:76-80.

Robertson C, et al. The association between induced and spontaneous abortion and risk of breast cancer in Slovenian women aged 25-54. Breast 2001;10:291-298.

Sanderson M, et al. Abortion history and breast cancer risk: Results from the Shangai Breast Cancer Study. Intl J Cancer 96, no. 6 2001:899-905.

Ye Z, et al. Breast cancer in relation to induced abortions in a cohort of Chinese women. Br J Cancer 87, no. 9. 2002:976.

Becher H, Schmidt S, Chang-Claude J. Reproductive factors and familial predisposition for breast cancer by age 50 years. A Case control family study for assessing main effects and possible gene-environment interaction. Intl J Epidemiol 2003;32:38-50.

Mahue-Giangreco M, Ursin G, Sullivan-Halley J, Bernstein L. Induced abortion, miscarriage, and breast cancer risk of young women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers & Prev 2003;12:209-214.

Meeske K, et al. Impact of reproductive factors and lactation on breast carcinomas in situ. Intl J Cancer 2004 110:103-109.

Palmer JR, et al. A prospective study of induced abortion and breast cancer in African-American women. Cancer Causes & Control 15, no. 2 2004:105-11.

Rosenblatt K. Induced abortions and the risk of all cancers combined and site-specific cancers in Shanghai. Cancer Causes and Control 17, no. 10 2006:1275-1280.

Tehranian N, et al. The effect of abortion on the risk of breast cancer. Iranian study presented at a conference at McMaster University. Available at:http://www.hdl.handle.net/10755/163877.

Naieni K, et al. Risk factors of breast cancer in north of Iran: a case-control in Mazandaran Province. Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev 8, no. 3 2007:395-8.

Henderson K. Incomplete pregnancy is not associated with breast cancer risk: the California Teachers Study. Contraception 77, no. 6 2008:391-396.

Lin, J et al. A case control study on risk factors of breast cancer among women in Cixi. Zhejiang Preventive Medicine, vol. 20, no. 6 June 2008:3-5.

Dolle J, et al. Risk Factors for Triple-negative breast cancer in women under the age of 45 years. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18, no. 4 2009:1157–66.

Ozmen V, et al. Breast cancer risk factors in Turkish women–a University Hospital based nested case control study. World J Surgical Oncology 7, no. 37 2009.

Xing P, et al. A case–control study of reproductive factors associated with subtypes of breast cancer in Northeast China. Medical Oncology 2009

Khachatryan L, et al. Influence of diabetes mellitus type 2 and prolonged estrogen exposure on risk of breast cancer among women in Armenia. Health Care for Women Intl, no. 32 2011:953-971.

Jiang AR, et al. Abortions and breast cancer risk in premenopausal and postmenopausal women in Jiangsu Province of China. Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev 2012;13:33-35. Available at: http://www.apjcpcontrol.org/page/popup_paper_file_view.php?pno=MzMtMzUgMTIuMiZrY29kZT0yNzAxJmZubz0w&pgubun=i

Jiang AR, et al. Abortions and breast cancer risk in premenopausal and postmenopausal women in Jiangsu Province of China. Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev 2012;13:33-35. Available at: http://www.apjcpcontrol.org/page/popup_paper_file_view.php?pno=MzMtMzUgMTIuMiZrY29kZT0yNzAxJmZubz0w&pgubun=i

Yanhua, C, et al. Reproductive Variables and Risk of Breast Malignant and Benign Tumours in Yunnan Province, China. Asian Pacific J Cancer Prev 2012;13, 2179-2184.

Kamath R, et al. A study on risk factors of breast cancer among patients attending the tertiary care hospital in Udupi district. Indian J Community Med 2013;38(2)95-99.

Jabeen S, et al. Breast cancer and some epidemiological risk factors: A hospital based study, J Dhaka Med Coll 2013;22(1)61-66.

Huang, Yubei, et. al. A meta-analysis of the association between induced abortion and breast cancer risk among Chinese females. Cancer Causes Control. Cancer Causes Control Accepted Nov 11, 2013.

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American Journal of Psychiatry on abortion

From a study in the American Journal of Psychiatry:

“Negative emotional response [to abortion] involving guilt, sadness and regret” is seen by some psychiatrists as a “part of the normal spectrum of response to abortion.”

CM Friedman, et al. “The Decision-Making Process and the Outcome of Therapeutic Abortion” American Journal of Psychiatry Vol 131(12) p 1332-1337, 1974 Copyright 1974, the American Psychiatric Assn.

It’s true that this is an old reference, but there is more recent research to back it up.

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Child abuse increases after abortion, says psychologist

“Our study indicates that child abuse is more frequent among mothers who have previously had an abortion. The mother’s guilt or high expectations may be reasons why there is this high correlation. A more plausible cause is that because of guilt, there is antepartum depression that interferes with the mother’s ability to bond.”

Dr. Philip Ney

“America Must Decide” The Life Chain People 1991

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