Voices are learned by babies in the womb

In the article “Fetal Psychology” scientists explain how a baby learns to differentiate between voices while in her mother’s womb. This article appeared in the reputable publication Psychology Today.

“Along with the ability to feel, see, and hear comes the capacity to learn and remember. … For example, a fetus, after an initial reaction of alarm, eventually stops responding to a repeated loud noise. The fetus displays the same kind of primitive learning, known as habituation, in response to its mother’s voice, Fifer has found.

But the fetus has shown itself capable of far more. In the 1980s, psychology professor Anthony James DeCasper, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, devised a feeding contraption that allows a baby to suck faster to hear one set of sounds through headphones and to suck slower to hear a different set. With this technique, DeCasper discovered that within hours of birth, a baby already prefers its mother’s voice to a stranger’s, suggesting it must have learned and remembered the voice, albeit not necessarily consciously, from its last months in the womb. More recently, he’s found that a newborn prefers a story read to it repeatedly in the womb – in this case, The Cat in the Hat – over a new story introduced soon after birth.

DeCasper and others have uncovered more mental feats. Newborns can not only distinguish their mother from a stranger speaking, but would rather hear Mom’s voice, especially the way it sounds filtered through amniotic fluid rather than through air. …

By monitoring changes in fetal heart rate, psychologist JeanPierre Lecanuet, Ph.D., and his colleagues in Paris have found that fetuses can even tell strangers’ voices apart.”

Janet L. Hopson “Fetal Psychology” Psychology Today, Sep/Oct98, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p44, 6p, 4c.

voices
18 weeks.
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Baby performs tactile stimulation to develop brain

A psychologist talking about how a baby’s brain develops in the uterus remarks on what a preborn baby does:

Heidelise Als, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist at Harvard Medical School, is fascinated by the amount of tactile stimulation a fetus gives itself. “It touches a hand to the face, one hand to the other hand, clasps its feet, touches its foot to its leg, its hand to its umbilical cord,” she reports.

Janet L. Hopson “Fetal Psychology” Psychology Today, Sep/Oct98, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p44, 6p, 4c.

000sss

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Preborn baby can feel, dream, enjoy being read to

From an article in Psychology Today. showing that a preborn baby in the womb enjoys being read to:

 A new wave of research suggests that the fetus can feel, dream, even enjoy The Cat in the Hat. The abortion debate may never be the same.

One psychologist weighs in on how a preborn baby moves:

Heidelise Als, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist at Harvard Medical School, is fascinated by the amount of tactile stimulation a fetus gives itself. “It touches a hand to the face, one hand to the other hand, clasps its feet, touches its foot to its leg, its hand to its umbilical cord,” she reports.

preborn baby at 10 weeks
Preborn baby at 10 weeks after conception- within the time frame that most abortions take place

The article goes on to say the following about unborn babies:

Along with the ability to feel, see, and hear comes the capacity to learn and remember. These activities can be rudimentary, automatic, even biochemical. For example, a fetus, after an initial reaction of alarm, eventually stops responding to a repeated loud noise. The fetus displays the same kind of primitive learning, known as habituation, in response to its mother’s voice, Fifer has found.

But the fetus has shown itself capable of far more. In the 1980s, psychology professor Anthony James DeCasper, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, devised a feeding contraption that allows a baby to suck faster to hear one set of sounds through headphones and to suck slower to hear a different set. With this technique, DeCasper discovered that within hours of birth, a baby already prefers its mother’s voice to a stranger’s, suggesting it must have learned and remembered the voice, albeit not necessarily consciously, from its last months in the womb. More recently, he’s found that a newborn prefers a story read to it repeatedly in the womb – in this case, The Cat in the Hat – over a new story introduced soon after birth.

DeCasper and others have uncovered more mental feats. Newborns can not only distinguish their mother from a stranger speaking, but would rather hear Mom’s voice, especially the way it sounds filtered through amniotic fluid rather than through air. They’re xenophobes, too: they prefer to hear Mom speaking in her native language than to hear her or someone else speaking in a foreign tongue.

preborn baby at 16 weeks, Legal to abort.
16 weeks, Legal to abort.

By monitoring changes in fetal heart rate, psychologist JeanPierre Lecanuet, Ph.D., and his colleagues in Paris have found that fetuses can even tell strangers’ voices apart. They also seem to like certain stories more than others. The fetal heartbeat will slow down when a familiar French fairy tale such as “La Poulette” (“The Chick”) or “Le Petit Crapaud” (“The Little Toad”), is read near the mother’s belly. When the same reader delivers another unfamiliar story, the fetal heartbeat stays steady.

Another scientist said:

Birth may be a grand occasion, says the Johns Hopkins University psychologist, but “it is a trivial event in development. Nothing neurologically interesting happens.”

Janet L. Hopson “Fetal Psychology” Psychology Today, Sep/Oct98, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p44, 6p, 4c.

Preborn baby – first trimester.
Preborn baby 
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Fetus is not “blob of jelly” as newspapers claim

Author Mary Kenny wrote:

“Looking back on the newspaper cuttings of the great abortion debate, the editorials in serious newspapers such as the Observer and the Sunday Times constantly referred to the foetus as “a blob of jelly”, “a piece of tissue”. But in the years in between the science of embryology has developed extraordinarily, and the “blob of jelly” is now known to have human organs all in place after eight weeks and an entire nervous system after ten weeks. I have watched many abortions taking place, and in the early stages the operation is so swiftly destructive that nothing can be properly perceived by the naked eye. Into the second trimester (after thirteen weeks) however, it is evident that this is a very tiny human being. Once past twenty weeks, the baby begins actually to try to resist the needle, which draws away its amniotic fluid.”

Mary Kenny Abortion: The Whole Story (London: Quartet Books, 1986) 6

20 weeks
20 weeks
Eight-week preborn baby
Eight-week preborn baby
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Doctor: ultrasound revealed baby in womb to be “active little creature”

Dr. Michael R Harrison on ultrasound:

“The fetus could not be taken seriously as long as he remained a medical recluse in an opaque womb; and it was not until the last half of this century that the prying eye of the ultrasound rendered the once opaque womb transparent, stripping the veil of mystery from the dark inner sanctum, and letting the light of scientific observation fall on the shy and secretive fetus….Sonography can accurately delineate normal and abnormal fetal anatomy with astounding detail. It can produce not only static images of the intact fetus, but real time “live” moving pictures… The sonographic voyeur, spying on the unwary fetus finds him or her a surprisingly active creature, and not at all the passive parasite we had imagined.”

Michael R Harrison “Unborn: Historical Perspectives of the Fetus As Patient” Pharos (Winter 1982): 19 – 24

7 weeks
7 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

article-2300983-18fd1520000005dc-721_634x598

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Doctors watch unborn babies “bounce” in the womb

10 weeks
10 weeks

One doctor describes seeing unborn babies playing on the ultrasound screen:

“When we’re watching the fetus on ultrasound and the mother starts to laugh, we can see the fetus, floating upside down in the womb, bounce up and down on its head, bum-bum-bum, like it’s bouncing on a trampoline. When mothers watch this on the screen, they laugh harder, and the fetus goes up and down even faster. We’ve wondered whether this is why people grow up liking roller coasters.”

Janet L. Hopson “Fetal Psychology” Psychology Today, Sep/Oct98, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p44, 6p, 4c.

 

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Babies in the womb are individuals, act in different ways

article-2300983-18fd1520000005dc-721_634x598From one researcher:

“Our own repeated observation of a large group of fetal infants…left us with no doubt that psychologically they were individuals. Just as no two looked alike, so no two behaved precisely alike… These were genuine individual differences already prophetic of the diversity which distinguishes the human family.”

Arnold GesellThe Embryology of Behavior” cited by Bart T Heffernan “The Early Biography of Everyman” in W Hilgers and Dennis J Horan, eds. Abortion and Social Justice (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1972) 17, 18

 

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At eleven weeks, a fetus senses touch

One doctor says the following about fetal development:

“By the eleventh week, the fetus develops sensitivity to touch on the hands, feet and genital areas…it may be more comfortable for us to attribute a vegetative state to the fetus in the first trimester, but in fact this is the most active period of our lives.”

Denis Cavanaugh, M.D., Testimony before Florida Legislature on Fetal Pain Bill, May 10, 1983

11 weeks
11 weeks

See pictures of what a fetus/baby looks like when he/she is aborted at this age.

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Scientist talks about development of brain in preborn baby

Here is some information on fetal brain development from Psychology Today:

The roots of human behavior, researchers now know, begin to develop early – just weeks after conception, in fact. Well before a woman typically knows she is pregnant, her embryo’s brain has already begun to bulge. By five weeks, the organ that looks like a lumpy inchworm has already embarked on the most spectacular feat of human development: the creation of the deeply creased and convoluted cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that will eventually allow the growing person to move, think, speak, plan, and create in a human way.

At nine weeks, the embryo’s ballooning brain allows it to bend its body, hiccup, and react to loud sounds. At week ten, it moves its arms, “breathes” amniotic fluid in and out, opens its jaw, and stretches. Before the first trimester is over, it yawns, sucks, and swallows, as well as feels and smells. By the end of the second trimester, it can hear; toward the end of pregnancy, it can see.

Janet L. Hopson “Fetal Psychology” Psychology Today, Sep/Oct98, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p44, 6p, 4c.

Baby at 9 weeks in the womb
Baby at 9 weeks in the womb

According to the Endowment for Human Development, a baby’s brain starts making brainwaves at about 43 days after conception.

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Preborn babies show individuality in the third month

This is from a statement titled “The Unborn Person Is Also a Patient” presented by a group of more than 200 doctors, many of whom were members of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. It was part of a Friend of the Court Brief filed before the United States Supreme Court:

3 months
3 months

“Every child shows a distinct individuality in his behavior by the end of the third month [in the womb]. This is because the actual structure of the muscles varies from baby to baby. The alignment of the muscles of the face, for example, following an inherited pattern.”

“Motion and Brief Amicus Curiae of Certain Physicians, Professionals and Fellows of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Support of Appellees”, submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States, October Term, 1971, no. 70 – 18, Roe vs. Wade, and no. 70 – 40, Doe vs. Bolton. Prepared by Dennis J Horan, at al

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