Fewer doctors are doing “difficult and upsetting” abortions

Richard Warren, honorary secretary of the RCOG (Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynecology) talks about the shortage of abortion doctors in Great Britain:

“In the past, abortion was an accepted part of the workload. People did not like it but they accepted that it was in the best interests of the woman concerned. Now people are given the option of opting out of the bits of the job they don’t like doing and if two or three say ‘No thanks’, it makes it easier for others to follow. There is an ethos that people go into medicine to save lives and look after people. Usually, a decision for termination is taken reluctantly even though it is recognised that it is in the best interests of the woman. It is difficult and upsetting work and it is done with obvious reticence. We are seeing more doctors who are reluctant to be involved in the process and this is happening in the context of growing demand.”

Jeremy Lauranc “ABORTION CRISIS AS DOCTORS REFUSE TO PERFORM SURGERY” The Independent, 16 April 2007

Doctors find aborting and dismembering a child like the one below is “difficult and upsetting” and they do not want to do it.

14 weeks

14 weeks

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About Sarah

Sarah Terzo is a freelance writer and journalist who works for Live Action. She is a member of the board of The Pro-life Alliance of Gays and Lesbians and Consistent Life.
This entry was posted in Emotional Impact on Providers, On the shortage of abortion doctors. Bookmark the permalink.

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