Category Archives: Textbooks and Scientists

Nursing textbook defines embryo as young human

The textbook Nursing and Allied Health defines the embryo as: “the human young from the time of fertilization of the ovum until the beginning of the third month.” Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing and Allied Health (Philadelphia: WB Sanders … Continue reading

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Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary definitions

Here are some of Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary’s definitions of words pertaining to pregnancy and preborn children. Embryo: “The early or developing stage of any organism, especially the developing product of fertilization of the egg. In the human, the embryo is … Continue reading

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Pro-Life writer quotes embryology textbook

Pro-life writer William M Connolly, in his book One Life:How the US Supreme Court Deliberately Distorted the History, Science and Law of Abortion, cites a textbook’s explanation of when life begins. “A baby begins life as a single cell, smaller … Continue reading

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National Academy of Sciences on conception

From testimony before a Senate Subcommittee: In 2002, the National Academy of Sciences acknowledged that “in medical terms” the embryo is a “developing human from fertilization” onwards. Richard M Doerflinger, testimony before US Senate Subcommittee on Science, Technology and Space, Committee … Continue reading

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Director of Neurobiology on life at conception

Dr. Sean O’Reilly, Director of the Neurobiology Research Training Program at George Washington University: “[T]here is nothing in the entire phenomenon of the transmission of life that deserves more to be called an event, scientifically speaking, that does fertilization. It … Continue reading

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New Scientist magazine: Life begins at fertilization

In an article in New Scientist, a task force of scientists came to the following conclusion: “The task force finds that the new recombinant DNA technologies indisputably prove that the unborn child is a whole human being from the moment of fertilization, … Continue reading

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Birth is “trivial event” in human development

In the article “Fetal Psychology” in Psychology Today, a researcher explains how the birth process is only a minor event in the life history of an individual, as no new brain development occurs in the baby as he or she travels down the … Continue reading

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Embryologic physiology, not legal opinion, should show when life begins

Bernard J Ficarra, M.D, who wrote the book Abortion Analyzed, writes about how life begins at conception: “A composite, unified, sacrosanct, unanimity of thought as to when life begins can be determined by studying embryologic physiology. Scientifically acknowledged pronouncements should be more … Continue reading

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Molecular biologist on human beings and human life

Declaration by Dr. David Fu-Chi Mark, a distinguished molecular biologist: A human being at an embryonic age and that human being at an adult age are naturally the same. The biological differences are due only to the differences in maturity. … Continue reading

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Dr. Jerome Lejeune: life begins at fertilzation

In March 1990, Dr. Jerome Lejeune, one of the world’s leading geneticists, testified before the Canadian Legislative Committee studying Bill C-43, An act Respecting Abortion. Dr. Lejeune told the Parliamentary Committee: “We know, beyond any possible, doubt, that when the … Continue reading

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